Summary

  • This article offers insights into the Numerical Reasoning Test, providing practical tips and an opportunity to undergo a pre-employment assessment test.
  • You will also learn about the differences between Numerical Reasoning Test and Business Math Test
  • This article assists future hires in understanding their skills and introduces premium tools designed to enhance preparation for both the job interview and the assessment test.
  • This post also shares practical tips with candidates on how to succeed and excel on the hiring exam and aims to equip job candidates with comprehensive knowledge and practice needed to increase their chances of securing their dream job and getting hired.

What is Numerical Reasoning Test

A Numerical reasoning test is a psychometric assessment designed to evaluate an individual's ability to understand, interpret, and analyze numerical information. It assesses quantitative aptitude, mathematical proficiency, and the capacity to work with numerical data in a logical and efficient manner.

Understanding numerical reasoning assessments and their role in the hiring process can empower candidates to prepare effectively and showcase their quantitative abilities to prospective employers.

Typically used in the pre-employment screening process, these tests help employers identify candidates with strong numerical skills, which are crucial in various professional roles.

Below are some interesting Facts about Numerical Reasoning Assessment Tests:

  1. Wide Applicability:
    • Numerical reasoning tests are used across diverse industries, including finance, consulting, engineering, data analysis, healthcare, and more. They are versatile assessments applicable to roles requiring quantitative decision-making.
  2. Common Components:
    • These tests often include questions related to basic arithmetic, percentages, ratios, data interpretation, and other mathematical concepts. The content may vary based on the complexity required for specific job roles.
  3. Time Constraints:
    • Time is a critical factor in numerical reasoning tests. Candidates are typically given a limited amount of time to complete the assessment, highlighting the importance of both accuracy and efficiency.
  4. Prevention of Random Guessing:
    • To discourage random guessing, some numerical reasoning tests impose penalties for incorrect answers. This approach ensures that candidates approach the questions thoughtfully rather than guessing haphazardly.
  5. Adaptability in Online Testing:
    • With the rise of online assessments, numerical reasoning tests are often administered digitally. This allows for efficient scoring, immediate feedback, and adaptability in tailoring the difficulty of questions based on a candidate's responses.
  6. Psychometric Validity:
    • Numerical reasoning tests have demonstrated high psychometric validity, meaning that performance on these tests correlates well with a candidate's ability to handle quantitative tasks in real-world job settings.
  7. Norm-Referenced Scores:
    • Scores on numerical reasoning tests are often presented in percentiles or other norm-referenced formats. This allows employers to compare a candidate's performance relative to a group of test-takers.
  8. Diversity in Question Formats:
    • Numerical reasoning questions come in various formats, including tables, graphs, charts, and word problems. This diversity ensures that the assessment measures a candidate's ability to interpret numerical information in different contexts.
  9. Global Usage:
    • Numerical reasoning tests are used globally by organizations of all sizes and industries. They provide a standardized and objective way to assess candidates' numerical skills, making them a valuable tool in the recruitment process.
  10. Training and Practice Resources:
    • Many candidates use practice resources and training materials to prepare for numerical reasoning tests. These resources help individuals familiarize themselves with the question formats and improve their speed and accuracy.
  11. Predictive of Job Performance:
    • Research suggests a positive correlation between performance on numerical reasoning tests and success in job roles that require numerical analysis, decision-making, and problem-solving.
  12. Continuous Evolution:
    • As technology and assessment methodologies advance, numerical reasoning tests continue to evolve. Modern assessments may include adaptive testing, multimedia elements, and advanced analytics for a more comprehensive evaluation.

Business Math Assessment

Business Math Tests assess candidates' proficiency in applying mathematical concepts and skills within business and financial contexts. These assessments typically cover a range of topics relevant to business operations, finance, accounting, and economics.

Business Math Tests assess candidates' ability to apply these mathematical concepts and skills in practical business scenarios, such as financial analysis, budgeting, forecasting, decision-making, and problem-solving. Job seekers should prepare by reviewing these mathematical concepts, practicing relevant calculations, and familiarizing themselves with common business math applications and scenarios.

Here are some key mathematical concepts and skills commonly assessed in Business Math Tests:

  1. Basic Arithmetic:
    • Addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division: Candidates should be able to perform basic arithmetic calculations accurately and efficiently, as these operations are fundamental to many business calculations.
  2. Percentage Calculations:
    • Calculating percentages: Candidates should be able to calculate percentages, including finding percentages of numbers, percentage increases or decreases, and percentage differences.
    • Profit and loss calculations: Candidates should understand how to calculate profits and losses as percentages of revenue or cost.
  3. Ratio and Proportion:
    • Understanding and comparing ratios: Candidates should be able to interpret and compare ratios, such as financial ratios used to evaluate company performance or compare financial statements.
  4. Interest and Time Value of Money:
    • Simple and compound interest: Candidates should understand the concepts of simple and compound interest and be able to calculate interest amounts and total loan or investment values over time.
    • Present value and future value: Candidates should understand the time value of money and be able to calculate present and future values of cash flows, investments, or loans.
  5. Basic Algebraic Equations:
    • Solving linear equations: Candidates should be able to solve simple algebraic equations, particularly those involving one variable, such as cost equations, revenue equations, or linear demand functions.
  6. Financial Calculations:
    • Calculating revenues, costs, and profits: Candidates should be able to calculate revenues, costs, and profits for businesses based on sales data, production costs, and other financial information.
    • Break-even analysis: Candidates should understand break-even analysis and be able to calculate the break-even point for a business based on fixed costs, variable costs, and selling prices.
  7. Statistics and Probability:
    • Understanding basic statistical concepts: Candidates should be familiar with basic statistical concepts such as mean, median, mode, standard deviation, and probability distributions.
    • Interpreting statistical data: Candidates should be able to interpret statistical data, including graphs, charts, and tables commonly used in business reports and financial statements.
  8. Graphical Analysis:
    • Interpreting graphs and charts: Candidates should be able to interpret and analyze graphical representations of numerical data, such as bar graphs, line graphs, and pie charts, commonly used in business reports and presentations.
  9. Currency Conversion:
    • Converting currencies: Candidates may be tested on their ability to convert currencies using exchange rates, particularly in multinational business contexts where currency conversions are necessary for financial transactions and reporting.
  10. Financial Ratios and Analysis:
    • Calculating financial ratios: Candidates should be able to calculate and interpret financial ratios, such as profitability ratios, liquidity ratios, and leverage ratios, used to assess a company's financial health and performance.

Differences

Numerical Reasoning Tests and Business Math Tests are both assessments designed to evaluate candidates' numerical abilities and mathematical skills.

While both Numerical Reasoning Tests and Business Math Tests assess candidates' numerical abilities, they differ in their focus, content, context, and application. Numerical Reasoning Tests evaluate general numerical aptitude and problem-solving skills, whereas Business Math Tests focus specifically on applying mathematical concepts to business and financial scenarios. Understanding the differences between these two types of assessments can help candidates prepare effectively and perform well in their job applications and assessments.

However, they differ in their focus, content, and objectives. Here are the main differences between Numerical Reasoning Tests and Business Math Tests:

  1. Focus and Content:
    • Numerical Reasoning Test: Numerical Reasoning Tests assess candidates' ability to interpret, analyze, and draw conclusions from numerical data presented in various formats, such as tables, graphs, and charts. These tests typically include questions that require candidates to perform calculations, identify patterns, and make logical deductions based on numerical information.
    • Business Math Test: Business Math Tests focus specifically on mathematical concepts and skills relevant to business and financial contexts. These tests may cover topics such as accounting principles, financial calculations, profit and loss analysis, interest rates, and business statistics.
  2. Context and Application:
    • Numerical Reasoning Test: Numerical Reasoning Tests are often used to assess candidates' general numerical aptitude and problem-solving abilities across different industries and job roles. The questions in these tests may not always be directly related to business or financial scenarios.
    • Business Math Test: Business Math Tests are tailored to assess candidates' proficiency in applying mathematical concepts and techniques to solve practical problems commonly encountered in business settings. The questions in these tests are typically framed within the context of business operations, finance, or economics.
  3. Complexity and Difficulty:
    • Numerical Reasoning Test: Numerical Reasoning Tests may vary in complexity, with questions ranging from basic arithmetic calculations to more advanced numerical analysis and interpretation. These tests often include a mix of easy, moderate, and challenging questions to assess candidates' abilities across different difficulty levels.
    • Business Math Test: Business Math Tests may include questions of varying difficulty levels, but the focus is primarily on applying mathematical concepts to real-world business scenarios. The complexity of questions in these tests may depend on the specific requirements of the job or industry for which candidates are being assessed.
  4. Purpose and Application:
    • Numerical Reasoning Test: Numerical Reasoning Tests are commonly used in the recruitment process to evaluate candidates' numerical aptitude, problem-solving skills, and analytical reasoning abilities. These tests help employers assess candidates' suitability for roles that require quantitative skills, critical thinking, and data analysis.
    • Business Math Test: Business Math Tests are specifically tailored to assess candidates' proficiency in applying mathematical concepts and techniques in business contexts. These tests are often used to evaluate candidates for roles in finance, accounting, sales, operations, and other business-related functions where mathematical skills are essential.

Jobs Assessed

Numerical Reasoning Tests and Business Math Tests are commonly used in the assessment process for a wide range of job roles across various industries.

Numerical Reasoning Tests are used to assess candidates' numerical aptitude, problem-solving skills, and ability to work with numerical data across various job roles and industries. Job seekers should prepare by practicing numerical reasoning questions, brushing up on relevant mathematical concepts, and understanding how numerical skills are applied in their specific field of interest.

Here are some examples of jobs that are often assessed with Numerical Reasoning Tests, along with relevant considerations for job seekers:

  1. Finance and Banking:
    • Roles: Financial Analyst, Investment Banker, Accountant, Risk Analyst
    • Considerations: Job seekers should be proficient in financial calculations, data analysis, and numerical reasoning. Knowledge of financial concepts such as ratios, percentages, and interest rates is crucial for success in these roles.
  2. Consulting:
    • Roles: Management Consultant, Strategy Consultant, Business Analyst
    • Considerations: Candidates should demonstrate strong analytical and problem-solving skills, as well as the ability to interpret and draw insights from numerical data. Familiarity with business metrics, market analysis, and financial modeling is beneficial.
  3. Technology and IT:
    • Roles: Data Analyst, Business Intelligence Analyst, IT Project Manager
    • Considerations: Numerical Reasoning Tests assess candidates' ability to work with data, perform calculations, and analyze trends. Job seekers should have a solid understanding of data analysis techniques, statistical methods, and quantitative research skills.
  4. Retail and Consumer Goods:
    • Roles: Retail Buyer, Merchandise Planner, Supply Chain Analyst
    • Considerations: Candidates should possess strong numerical skills for inventory management, demand forecasting, and pricing analysis. Knowledge of retail math concepts, such as sales trends, profit margins, and inventory turnover, is essential.
  5. Healthcare and Pharmaceuticals:
    • Roles: Healthcare Analyst, Pharmaceutical Sales Representative, Clinical Research Associate
    • Considerations: Job seekers should be proficient in interpreting healthcare data, conducting statistical analysis, and understanding medical research studies. Numerical Reasoning Tests may assess candidates' ability to analyze patient outcomes, drug efficacy, and healthcare costs.
  6. Government and Public Sector:
    • Roles: Policy Analyst, Public Administration Officer, Urban Planner
    • Considerations: Candidates should demonstrate quantitative skills for analyzing government data, conducting budget analysis, and evaluating policy impacts. Knowledge of statistical methods, economic modeling, and financial analysis is valuable in these roles.
  7. Manufacturing and Engineering:
    • Roles: Production Engineer, Quality Control Analyst, Operations Manager
    • Considerations: Job seekers should be proficient in numerical reasoning for process optimization, quality assurance, and supply chain management. Knowledge of engineering calculations, statistical process control, and Six Sigma principles is beneficial.
  8. Human Resources and Talent Management:
    • Roles: HR Analyst, Compensation Specialist, Talent Acquisition Manager
    • Considerations: Candidates should possess numerical skills for analyzing HR metrics, conducting compensation analysis, and forecasting workforce trends. Familiarity with statistical methods, survey data analysis, and HR analytics tools is advantageous.

Typical Test Outline

Both Numerical reasoning assessments and Business Math Assessments are used by employers to assess a candidate's ability to handle tasks that involve numbers, which can be crucial in roles such as finance, data analysis, accounting, and many others.

Both tests evaluate a candidate's ability to work with numerical information and solve problems that involve numbers.

High scores in these tests can demonstrate a candidate's proficiency in handling numerical data and may increase their chances of being considered for the position.

These topics can vary in complexity depending on the specific numerical reasoning assessment and the job requirements. Candidates should prepare by reviewing these topics and practicing relevant questions to improve their numerical problem-solving skills.

These tests typically cover various topics to assess a candidate's quantitative skills. Here are some common topics used in numerical reasoning assessment tests, along with brief descriptions of each:

Test Topic Detailed Description
Basic Arithmetic Description: This includes fundamental mathematical operations such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.
Example: Calculate the sum of two numbers or perform long division.
Percentages Description: Candidates are tested on their ability to work with percentages, which involve calculating percentages of numbers and solving percentage-related problems.
Example: Determine what percentage of a budget is spent on a particular expense.
Ratios and Proportions Description: This topic assesses a candidate's understanding of ratios, proportions, and their ability to solve problems involving them.
Example: Find the ratio of boys to girls in a classroom or solve a proportion equation.
Data Interpretation Description: Candidates are presented with tables, charts, graphs, or data sets and are required to interpret the information to answer questions.
Example: Analyze a bar chart showing sales figures and determine the highest-selling product.
Currency Conversions Description: This involves converting between different currencies using exchange rates.
Example: Convert an amount from one currency to another based on the given exchange rate.
Financial Calculations Description: Candidates may be tested on financial concepts like profit and loss, interest, and investments.
Example: Calculate the profit margin on a product or determine the final amount in an investment account after a specified period.
Averages and Means Description: Assessing a candidate's knowledge of calculating averages, including mean, median, and mode.
Example: Calculate the average score of a set of test results.
Financial Calculations Description: Candidates may need to make reasonable estimations when exact calculations are not possible or practical.
Example: Estimate the total number of people in a crowd based on a sample count.
Number Series Description: Involves recognizing patterns in number sequences and determining the next number in the sequence.
Example: Identify the missing number in a sequence like 2, 4, 8, 16, __.
Word Problems Description: Real-world scenarios are presented in which candidates must use numerical reasoning to solve problems.
Example: Calculate the time it takes for two trains traveling at different speeds to meet.
Geometry and Measurement Description: Topics like area, perimeter, volume, and geometric shapes may be included in some tests.
Example: Calculate the area of a rectangle or find the volume of a cube.
Time and Distance Description: Candidates may need to calculate time, distance, and speed relationships.
Example: Determine how long it takes to travel a certain distance at a given speed.

Use in Hiring Process

Numerical Reasoning Tests and Business Math Assessments are widely used across various industries to assess candidates' numerical and mathematical skills, as well as their ability to analyze and interpret numerical data.

Tests are used across a wide range of industries and by specific employers within those industries to assess candidates' numerical and mathematical skills, as well as their ability to analyze and interpret numerical data in various contexts.

Here's a detailed overview of industries and specific employers that commonly utilize Numerical Reasoning Tests:

  1. Finance and Banking:
    • Employers: JPMorgan Chase, Goldman Sachs, Citibank, Bank of America
    • Use: In finance and banking, Numerical Reasoning Tests are crucial for assessing candidates' ability to analyze financial data, perform calculations, and make informed decisions related to investments, risk management, and financial planning.
  2. Consulting:
    • Employers: McKinsey & Company, Boston Consulting Group (BCG), Bain & Company
    • Use: Consulting firms use Numerical Reasoning Tests to evaluate candidates' quantitative reasoning skills, problem-solving abilities, and capacity to work with data in solving complex business challenges for clients across various industries.
  3. Technology and IT:
    • Employers: Google, Microsoft, Apple, IBM
    • Use: In the technology sector, Numerical Reasoning Tests assess candidates' analytical skills, logical reasoning, and ability to work with numerical data in roles related to data analysis, software engineering, project management, and product development.
  4. Retail and Consumer Goods:
    • Employers: Amazon, Walmart, Procter & Gamble, Unilever
    • Use: Retail and consumer goods companies utilize Numerical Reasoning Tests to evaluate candidates' ability to analyze sales data, forecast demand, manage inventory, and make strategic decisions related to pricing, promotions, and product launches.
  5. Healthcare and Pharmaceuticals:
    • Employers: Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson, Merck, Novartis
    • Use: In the healthcare and pharmaceutical industries, Numerical Reasoning Tests assess candidates' ability to interpret clinical trial data, analyze patient outcomes, and make evidence-based decisions related to drug development, marketing, and regulatory compliance.
  6. Manufacturing and Engineering:
    • Employers: General Electric, Boeing, Toyota, Siemens
    • Use: Manufacturing and engineering companies use Numerical Reasoning Tests to assess candidates' mathematical skills, problem-solving abilities, and capacity to analyze production data, optimize processes, and ensure quality control in manufacturing operations.
  7. Government and Public Sector:
    • Employers: Federal government agencies, state and local government departments
    • Use: Government organizations utilize Numerical Reasoning Tests to evaluate candidates' ability to analyze budgetary data, conduct financial forecasting, and make data-driven decisions in policy development, program management, and public administration.

 

Practice Numerical Reasoning Test

Scoring Model

These Tests employ various scoring models to evaluate candidates' performance and provide objective assessments of their numerical and mathematical abilities.

Each scoring model offers unique insights into candidates' performances on Numerical Reasoning Tests and Business Math Assessments, and can be used to inform hiring decisions, identify high-potential candidates, and provide feedback for candidates' professional development. Employers may choose the scoring model that best aligns with their assessment goals and preferences for evaluating candidates' numerical and mathematical abilities.

Here are some common scoring models used:

  1. Raw Score:
    • Definition: The raw score represents the number of correct answers a candidate provides on the test.
    • Calculation: Each correct answer is awarded one point, and incorrect or unanswered questions typically receive zero points.
    • Use: The raw score provides a basic measure of candidates' performance on the test, but it does not account for differences in question difficulty or allow for meaningful comparisons between candidates.
  2. Percentile Rank:
    • Definition: The percentile rank indicates the percentage of candidates in the norm group that a test-taker outperforms.
    • Calculation: The candidate's raw score is compared to the scores of a representative sample of test-takers (norm group), and their percentile rank is determined based on how their score ranks relative to others.
    • Use: Percentile ranks allow for comparisons between candidates and provide insight into how a candidate's performance compares to that of their peers.
  3. Scaled Score:
    • Definition: The scaled score is a standardized score that adjusts for differences in test difficulty and allows for meaningful comparisons between candidates.
    • Calculation: Raw scores are converted into scaled scores using a predetermined formula or conversion table provided by the test publisher.
    • Use: Scaled scores provide a standardized measure of candidates' performance that accounts for differences in test versions or administrations.
  4. Z-Score:
    • Definition: The Z-score indicates how many standard deviations a candidate's raw score is from the mean (average) score of the norm group.
    • Calculation: The candidate's raw score is converted into a Z-score using the mean and standard deviation of the norm group's scores.
    • Use: Z-scores allow for comparisons between candidates' performances relative to the norm group's average, with a Z-score of 0 indicating average performance and positive or negative scores indicating performance above or below average, respectively.
  5. Stanine Score:
    • Definition: Stanine (Standard Nine) scores categorize candidates' performances into nine predefined bands, ranging from 1 (lowest) to 9 (highest).
    • Calculation: Raw scores are converted into stanine scores based on predetermined intervals or cutoff points.
    • Use: Stanine scores provide a simplified way to interpret candidates' performances and classify them into broad performance categories for decision-making purposes.
  6. T-Score:
    • Definition: The T-score is a standardized score with a mean of 50 and a standard deviation of 10, allowing for comparisons between candidates' performances on different versions of the test.
    • Calculation: Raw scores are converted into T-scores using a formula that adjusts for differences in test difficulty and variability.
    • Use: T-scores provide a standardized measure of candidates' performances that facilitate comparisons across different test versions or administrations.

Numerical Reasoning Test Practice

Question 1. How much bigger the Environmental pollution of Chemical industry compared to Cement industry?

  1. 48.3%
  2. 55.3%
  3. 58.2%
  4. 60.8%

 

Correct Answer is 3: 58.2%

  • Environmental pollution of Chemical Industry is 34.5% and Cement Industry is 21.8%
  • hemical Industry pollution compared to Cement Industry = 34.5-21.8 = 12.7 Percentage value = (12.7 / 21.8) * 100% = 58.2%

Time Management Strategies

Preparing for a Numerical Reasoning Test and Business Math Assessment requires a combination of practice, familiarity with the test format, and effective time management strategies.

By following these preparation and time management strategies, candidates can enhance their readiness for Numerical Reasoning Tests and improve their chances of success on the assessment. Regular practice, effective time management, and a strategic approach to problem-solving are key to achieving a high score and demonstrating proficiency in numerical reasoning skills.

Here are various preparation and time management strategies candidates can use to successfully prepare for and pass Numerical Reasoning Tests:

  1. Understand the Test Format:
    • Familiarize yourself with the format of the Numerical Reasoning Test, including the types of questions, instructions, and time limits.
    • Review sample questions and practice tests provided by reputable sources or test publishers to gain insights into the test structure and question types.
  2. Brush Up on Basic Math Skills:
    • Review fundamental mathematical concepts, such as arithmetic, percentages, ratios, fractions, decimals, and basic algebra.
    • Practice mental math techniques to improve calculation speed and accuracy, as Numerical Reasoning Tests often require quick calculations.
  3. Practice Regularly:
    • Dedicate regular study sessions to practice Numerical Reasoning Test questions and exercises.
    • Work through a variety of numerical problems and scenarios to build confidence and proficiency in solving different types of numerical problems.
  4. Develop Problem-Solving Strategies:
    • Learn problem-solving strategies, such as breaking down complex problems into smaller, more manageable steps, and identifying relevant information in numerical data sets.
    • Practice identifying patterns, relationships, and trends in numerical data to improve your ability to analyze and interpret information.
  5. Manage Your Time Effectively:
    • Allocate time for each question based on its complexity and the overall time limit for the test.
    • Prioritize questions and tackle easier or quicker questions first to build momentum and maximize your score.
    • Monitor your progress throughout the test and adjust your pace accordingly to ensure you complete as many questions as possible within the allotted time.
  6. Read Questions Carefully:
    • Read each question carefully and ensure you understand what is being asked before attempting to solve it.
    • Pay attention to units of measurement, data labels, and any additional information provided in the question stem or accompanying data sets.
  7. Avoid Guessing Blindly:
    • Avoid guessing blindly on questions if there is a penalty for incorrect answers, as this could lower your overall score.
    • Use educated guesses when you can eliminate unlikely answer choices or narrow down options based on logical reasoning.
  8. Review and Learn from Mistakes:
    • Review your practice test results and identify areas where you made mistakes or encountered difficulties.
    • Analyze your errors to understand the underlying concepts or strategies you need to improve and focus your study efforts accordingly.
  9. Stay Calm and Focused:
    • Maintain a positive mindset and stay calm under pressure during the test.
    • Take short breaks if needed to refocus and recharge, but avoid getting distracted or overwhelmed by time constraints.
  10. Simulate Test Conditions:
    • Practice Numerical Reasoning Tests under timed conditions to simulate the test environment and build test-taking stamina.
    • Use a quiet and distraction-free environment for your practice sessions to replicate the conditions of the actual test.

SHL Numerical Reasoning Test

The SHL numerical reasoning test is a widely used psychometric assessment designed to evaluate an individual's ability to interpret and analyze numerical information. It is employed by organizations globally as part of their pre-employment screening process. The test typically presents candidates with a series of numerical data, including tables, charts, and graphs, and requires them to answer questions based on the information provided. These questions assess a candidate's proficiency in various mathematical concepts such as percentages, ratios, and basic arithmetic operations.

Candidates taking the SHL numerical reasoning test are often subjected to a time constraint, highlighting the importance of not only accuracy but also efficiency in solving numerical problems. The questions may vary in complexity, testing candidates on their ability to navigate through data sets of different intricacies. SHL's numerical reasoning test is known for its adaptability and may adjust the difficulty of questions based on a candidate's previous responses.

Scores on the SHL numerical reasoning test are typically presented in percentile rankings, allowing employers to compare a candidate's performance relative to a normative group. Success in the test is often indicative of an individual's aptitude for tasks that involve numerical analysis, making it a valuable tool for predicting job performance in roles that require quantitative skills. As part of the broader SHL assessments, the numerical reasoning test contributes to a comprehensive evaluation of a candidate's abilities and suitability for a particular job. Continuous updates and refinements to the SHL numerical reasoning test reflect the evolving landscape of psychometric assessments in the field of recruitment and talent acquisition.

Click on this link to practice and prepare for SHL Numerical Reasoning Tests

Jobs Assessed

Numerical reasoning assessment tests and Business Math Tests are commonly used in the pre-employment screening process for a variety of jobs, especially those that require strong analytical and quantitative skills.

Here are some popular jobs where numerical reasoning tests are often used:

  1. Finance and Accounting Roles:
    • Job Titles: Financial Analyst, Accountant, Auditor
    • Reasoning: Numerical reasoning tests are relevant for roles that involve financial analysis, budgeting, and accounting, where candidates need strong numerical skills.
  2. Banking and Investment Banking:
    • Job Titles: Investment Banker, Risk Analyst, Financial Consultant
    • Reasoning: Numerical reasoning is crucial in the financial industry, where professionals need to analyze data, assess risks, and make financial decisions.
  3. Data Analysis and Statistics:
    • Job Titles: Data Analyst, Statistician, Research Analyst
    • Reasoning: Proficiency in numerical reasoning is essential for roles that involve data interpretation, statistical analysis, and drawing meaningful insights from numerical information.
  4. Engineering and Technical Roles:
    • Job Titles: Engineer, Technical Analyst, Systems Analyst
    • Reasoning: Numerical reasoning is fundamental in engineering and technical fields where professionals deal with calculations, measurements, and quantitative aspects of projects.
  5. IT and Computer Science:
    • Job Titles: Programmer, Software Engineer, IT Consultant
    • Reasoning: Numerical reasoning skills are relevant in coding, algorithm design, and problem-solving in the field of information technology.
  6. Supply Chain and Logistics:
    • Job Titles: Supply Chain Analyst, Logistics Coordinator, Operations Manager
    • Reasoning: In roles related to supply chain management, candidates are often required to interpret numerical data related to inventory, shipments, and operational efficiency.
  7. Sales and Marketing Analytics:
    • Job Titles: Sales Analyst, Marketing Data Specialist
    • Reasoning: Numerical reasoning tests are used to assess candidates' ability to analyze sales data, market trends, and make data-driven decisions in sales and marketing roles.
  8. Management and Consulting:
    • Job Titles: Management Consultant, Business Analyst
    • Reasoning: Professionals in consulting and management roles often need strong numerical reasoning skills to analyze business data, financial reports, and make strategic decisions.
  9. Healthcare and Pharmaceuticals:
    • Job Titles: Pharmaceutical Researcher, Health Data Analyst
    • Reasoning: Numerical reasoning is important in healthcare roles that involve data analysis, drug development, and statistical interpretation of medical research.
  10. Government and Public Policy:
    • Job Titles: Policy Analyst, Researcher
    • Reasoning: Numerical reasoning skills are valuable in roles where professionals analyze statistical data, economic trends, and make data-driven recommendations for public policy decisions.
  11. Human Resources and People Analytics:
    • Job Titles: HR Analyst, People Operations Specialist
    • Reasoning: In HR roles, numerical reasoning tests may be used to assess candidates' ability to analyze workforce data, compensation figures, and make data-driven decisions.
  12. Retail and Merchandising:
    • Job Titles: Merchandising Analyst, Retail Operations Manager
    • Reasoning: Numerical reasoning is relevant in roles where professionals analyze sales data, inventory turnover, and pricing strategies in the retail sector.

Skills Assessed

Numerical reasoning tests and Business Math Tests are commonly used in various industries, such as finance, consulting, engineering, and data analysis, to assess candidates' quantitative abilities. These assessments help employers identify individuals who can efficiently and accurately work with numerical information, a critical skill in many professional roles.

These tests are designed to assess an individual's ability to interpret and analyze numerical information. These tests evaluate various skills related to quantitative reasoning, numerical analysis, and mathematical proficiency. The specific skills assessed as part of a numerical reasoning test include:

  1. Basic Arithmetic:
    • Assessing candidates' proficiency in fundamental arithmetic operations such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.
  2. Percentage Calculations:
    • Testing the ability to calculate and interpret percentages, which is crucial in various business and financial scenarios.
  3. Ratio and Proportion:
    • Evaluating understanding and application of ratios and proportions, which are commonly used in analyzing relationships between quantities.
  4. Fractions and Decimals:
    • Assessing the ability to work with fractions and decimals, which is important in tasks involving precision and accuracy.
  5. Interpretation of Tables and Charts:
    • Testing the capability to interpret numerical data presented in tables, graphs, charts, or other visual formats.
  6. Data Analysis:
    • Assessing the ability to analyze and draw conclusions from numerical data, including trends, patterns, and variations.
  7. Currency Conversions:
    • Evaluating proficiency in converting currencies, a skill often required in roles involving international business or finance.
  8. Basic Algebraic Concepts:
    • Assessing familiarity with basic algebraic concepts such as solving equations, working with variables, and understanding algebraic expressions.
  9. Profit and Loss Calculations:
    • Testing the ability to calculate profits and losses, which is essential in business and financial decision-making.
  10. Interest Calculations:
    • Evaluating the understanding of simple and compound interest calculations, important in financial contexts.
  11. Time and Speed Calculations:
    • Assessing the ability to calculate time, speed, and distance, which is relevant in roles involving logistics or project management.
  12. Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving:
    • Testing the capacity to approach numerical problems logically and find efficient solutions within a given time frame.
  13. Numerical Sequences and Patterns:
    • Evaluating the ability to recognize and analyze numerical sequences or patterns, a skill relevant to various analytical roles.
  14. Statistical Concepts:
    • Assessing basic understanding of statistical concepts, such as averages, standard deviation, and probability.
  15. Logical Reasoning with Numbers:
    • Testing the logical reasoning ability when working with numerical data, including the deduction of information and drawing conclusions.

 

How The Test is Scored

Scoring models for numerical reasoning tests and Business Math Tests are designed to objectively assess candidates' numerical and quantitative skills. The scoring process typically involves evaluating both the accuracy and speed of a candidate's responses. While specific scoring models can vary, the general principles include:

Accuracy: Candidates are awarded points for correct answers. Each correct response contributes to the overall accuracy score. This emphasizes the importance of precision and correctness in numerical calculations.

Penalties for Incorrect Answers: Some numerical reasoning tests may employ a penalty system for incorrect answers. This discourages random guessing and emphasizes the importance of accuracy. In such cases, points may be deducted for each incorrect response.

Time Constraints: Time is a critical factor in numerical reasoning tests. Candidates are often given a limited amount of time to complete the test. The scoring model may consider the number of correct responses within the allocated time, emphasizing efficiency and the ability to perform under time constraints.

Speed of Response: In addition to accuracy, the speed at which candidates answer questions is often taken into account. This reflects the ability to quickly analyze and solve numerical problems. Some tests may use a combination of accuracy and speed to calculate the final score.

Complexity of Questions: Some numerical reasoning tests feature questions of varying difficulty levels. The scoring model may assign different weights to questions based on their complexity. More challenging questions may contribute more to the overall score.

Scoring Bands or Percentiles: Scores are often presented in the context of scoring bands or percentiles. This allows employers to compare a candidate's performance relative to others who have taken the same test. For example, a candidate scoring in the 90th percentile performed better than 90% of the test takers.

Normalization: In large-scale assessments, normalization may be applied to adjust scores and account for variations in test difficulty across different versions or administrations. This ensures fairness and consistency in score interpretation.

Total Raw Score: The total raw score is the sum of correct answers, taking into account any penalties for incorrect responses. This raw score is then converted into a scaled or standardized score for easier comparison.

Pass/Fail Threshold: Depending on the purpose of the test, there may be a predefined pass/fail threshold. Candidates scoring above the threshold are considered to have passed the test, while those below it may be deemed unsuccessful.

How to Succeed on the Test

Practicing before taking the test is a strategic investment in a candidate's success.

It not only enhances familiarity with the test but also enables candidates to fine-tune their skills, manage time effectively, and build the confidence needed to perform at their best. Regular, targeted practice is a key component of successful test preparation.

Here's a detailed breakdown of why practicing is important and how it helps job candidates pass the test:

  • Familiarity with Test Format: Practicing exposes candidates to the specific format of the assessment, including the structure of the questions, the time constraints, and any unique features of the test. This familiarity helps reduce anxiety and nervousness during the actual test, allowing candidates to navigate the assessment with more confidence.
  • Understanding Question Types: Different assessments include various question types, whether they are related to cognitive abilities, personality traits, or job-related skills. Practicing enables candidates to understand the types of questions they might encounter, whether it's numerical reasoning, verbal reasoning, situational judgment, or others. Recognizing question patterns allows candidates to develop effective strategies for each type.
  • Identifying Areas of Weakness: Through practice, candidates can identify their strengths and weaknesses in different areas assessed by the test. Recognizing areas of weakness allows candidates to focus their efforts on improvement, whether it involves brushing up on certain skills or learning specific strategies to approach particular question types more effectively.
  • Time Management Skills: Assessment tests are often timed, and effective time management is crucial. Practicing helps candidates develop strategies for allocating time wisely across different sections, ensuring that they can complete the test within the given timeframe. This is particularly important for cognitive aptitude tests where time pressure is a common factor.
  • Building Confidence: Confidence plays a significant role in test performance. As candidates practice and become more comfortable with the test format and question types, their confidence levels increase. This heightened confidence positively impacts their ability to approach questions calmly, make reasoned decisions, and perform optimally.
  • Improving Performance: Regular practice contributes to skill improvement and enhances overall performance. Whether it's refining mathematical abilities, honing critical thinking skills, or becoming more adept at interpreting graphs and data, candidates who practice consistently are likely to see improvement in the areas assessed by the test.
  • Reducing Test Anxiety: Assessment tests can be stressful, especially if candidates are unprepared. Practicing serves as a form of stress inoculation, helping candidates manage anxiety by providing a sense of control and preparedness. Familiarity with the test conditions and content contributes to a more relaxed and focused test-taking experience.
  • Customizing Study Strategies: Through practice, candidates can determine which study methods and strategies work best for them. Some may benefit from more frequent, shorter practice sessions, while others may prefer more extended study periods. Understanding one's optimal study approach can maximize the effectiveness of preparation efforts.

Practice is crucial for success in assessment tests as it familiarizes individuals with the test format, refines their skills, and enhances their confidence.

Why Prepare with JobTestPrep Practice Materials

  1. Realistic Test Simulation: JobTestPrep provides practice tests that accurately replicate the format and difficulty level of the actual test, allowing you to prepare effectively for the real assessment.
  2. Eliminate Stress by Practicing Time Management Practice: Practicing with time limits helps you improve your speed and accuracy during the test, ensuring you can efficiently complete all sections within the allotted time.
  3. Get Detailed Feedback and Customized Study Plan: JobTestPrep's practice tests offer detailed feedback and personalized study plans based on your performance, enabling targeted improvement and optimized study time.

What Do Our Customers Saying about Us

caret-down caret-up caret-left caret-right
Steve Punyali

Thank you very much, your presentation is very useful to learn. God bless you.

J R

Another excellent tutorial. I opened my own blank worksheet and copied the original and used pause to carry out step by step what was taught. I'm proud of my work and my 3-D chart all within the print area. This style of tutorial works really well for me. Thank you so much, Vadim you are the Best.

Barry FitzHugh

Vadim, outstanding classroom instruction methodology, sir, very helpful, love the soothing background music, your meticulous attention to detail makes for indelible subject matter retention, Bravo! Bravo!

Yu-Jun E

Thank you!! I just passed my excel test that I needed to be promoted!!

Dreamwriterpoet

Excellent teacher! I like your accent. Your demeanor comes across patient, eager to teach, ability to give relatable examples. English is very good well spoken. Comprehensive knowledge of the subject being taught with multiple strategies to teach.

Bass Monkey

Im in 8th grade and this was very very helpful to get me to pass my excel certification!!

You Already Know

Thanks for the tutorial. Had my interview/ performance excel test today. I used some of your tips. They came in handy. I will know in two weeks if I got the gig. Thanks!!!

Ahmed H.

Great information and excellent information. Just what I needed to pass my Excel Employment Interview. Kudos to you and good for me. Muchas gracias and thanks very much.

Karla Eusebio

Thank you so much! I always get anxious during excel practical examinations because I only know basics. This helped me a lot.

RoseRose RoseRose

Am learning a lot. Thank you very much my friend. Bless you.

Natasha Lauren

Vadim, your uploads are really helpful for me as I'm a relative newbie to Excel. I think your style of presenting is perfect for demonstrating Excel and I'm very grateful for the Bonus question at the end as I'm learning financial mathematics. Thanks again brother, keep up the good work!

Akim Eusebio

Thank you so much! I always get anxious during excel practical examinations because I only know basics. This helped me a lot.

Podina Tutorials

insane and in perfect Tutorial. thanks ! Would love to see more Tutorials form you, more in depth with examples, than the one you made.

Alexandra D

I just completed the quiz successfully! 7 questions were asked same way in the video! Will definitely learn Excel now! However it's not required for me but good to have Excel knowledge

Ogetsirius100

This information is excellent the way you explain it, thank you!

Connella Cyrus

Thanks a MILLION. I've learnt so much. You are a very good teacher. Thank you!!

Gilbert K

Thank you for the Video. I just aced the assessment. I was a little scared though because only about 5 of the questions from here came but I wouldn't have passed this if not of this video, gracias.

Next Step: Prepare for the Assessment Test

Preparing for an employment assessment test can be a daunting task, but practicing beforehand can significantly improve your chances of success. Below are 3 reasons why you might consider to get prepared by practicing using Numerical Reasoning Assessment Test or Business Math materials from JobTestPrep.

1 Realistic Test Simulation: JobTestPrep provides practice tests that accurately replicate the format and difficulty level of the actual test, allowing you to prepare effectively for the real assessment.
2 Eliminate Stress by Practicing Time Management Practice: Practicing with time limits helps you improve your speed and accuracy during the test, ensuring you can efficiently complete all sections within the allotted time.
3 Get Detailed Feedback and Customized Study Plan: JobTestPrep's practice tests offer detailed feedback and personalized study plans based on your performance, enabling targeted improvement and optimized study time.

 

Practice Now

 

?
Can't Find Your Test? Download Sample Assessment Test Questions PDF to find the test you need. Or if you still have questions about how to practice for your upcoming test, please contact us, and we'll get back to you within 24 hours.